WMO supports expansion of global AMDAR weather data


Earth as seen from space - AMDAR helps contribute to global weather knowledgeThe World Meterological Organisation (WMO) has held talks and entered into a new working arrangement with the International Air Transport Association (IATA) on the operation of the global Aircraft Meteorological Data Relay (AMDAR) system.

WMO Secretary-General Petteri Taalas met IATA Director General Alexandre de Juniac to discuss how IATA’s 265 airlines in more than 100 countries can best contribute to AMDAR’s data gathering system.

WMO AMDAR observing system commenced around 30 years ago and has now grown to involve 40 airlines and over 4,000 aircraft.

The AMDAR system uses aircraft onboard sensors, computers and communications systems to collect, process and transmit meteorological data to ground stations via satellite or radio links. ACARS links have been the mainstay of the inflight data gathering, but WMO is looking at what is possible with next-gen satcom/broadband technology.

Once on the ground, the data is relayed to National Meteorological and Hydrological Services, where it is processed, quality controlled and transmitted on the WMO Global Telecommunications System (GTS).

The WMO global AMDAR system currently produces more than 700,000 high-quality observations per day of air temperature and wind speed and direction, together with the required positional and temporal information and with an increasing number of humidity and turbulence measurements being made.

The data collected is used for a range of meteorological applications, including, public weather forecasting, climate monitoring and prediction, early warning systems for weather hazards and, importantly, weather monitoring and prediction in support of the aviation industry.

There are three elements of the AMDAR observing system that make it especially valuable:

  • AMDAR wind and temperature data have been shown to be similar in quality (i.e. accuracy or uncertainty of measurement) to that of radiosondes;

  • The measurement sensors and systems on the aircraft are able to produce these data at a very high rate or frequency of measurement, thus providing very fine detail within the vertical profiles; and

  • Owing to the frequency with which aircraft are landing and taking off from airports, these vertical profiles can be produced on at least a 3-hourly basis at many airport locations.

WMO says AMDAR has a significant positive impact on forecast accuracy which leads to improved forecasts and services to the aviation industry.

WMO has worked collaboratively with IATA over many decades to establish the meteorological technical methods and practices to fulfil the aeronautical users’ requirements.

It says is has worked closely with IATA and their respective members to ensure fair and transparent cost recovery mechanisms are in place for aeronautical meteorological service provision.

IATA can help WMO to expand and improve the operation of the AMDAR programme while WMO can help to ensure that data owned by airline partners are better secured.

WMO also signed an agreement with the International Civil Aviation Organization in April to work more closely together.

View a video on AMDAR and how it works here

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WMO supports expansion of global AMDAR weather data was last modified: July 10th, 2017 by Steve Nichols
Filed in: e-Aircraft Tags: , , ,

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